Beyond just an Allowance: How to Engage your Young Kids in Learning about Money from a Young Age

by Fiona Leung on Mar 9, 2019

Think back to those early days in life when it seemed like everything in the candy aisle was free if you begged your parents hard enough. Not a fleeting thought was given to the expenses of a vacation or the copay costs at the doctor. There’s something beautifully unburdened in the way which children experience the world: recklessly present and innocently ambivalent.

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Habits of a Savvy Saving Family

by Fiona Leung on Mar 2, 2019

When people warn you that having kids is expensive, it’s no joke. From diapers to food, braces to sports activities the costs add up quick. For a middle-income family in the U.S. raising a child up until age 18, costs an estimated average of $245,340 (or $304,480, adjusted for projected inflation), according to the 2013 “Cost of Raising a Child” report from the U.S.

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Retained Life Estate: Open the Door to Tax Charitable Deductions

by Fiona Leung on Feb 26, 2019

A home is a place to rest your head, to create memories, and to cook dinner. It’s where your pets are—your family. What people most often forget about their home is that it’s also your most valuable financial asset. And, if one of your financial goals includes a testamentary gift to charity, while also receiving substantive income tax deductions, this asset is important.

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New Home Financing Checklist

by Fiona Leung on Feb 23, 2019

While owning a home is the quintessential American dream, not everyone is able to purchase a home when they desire. If you’re fresh out of school with a boat load of student debt, it’s probably best to wait until you’ve been working for at least a year before you start looking to buy. You’ll also want to make sure that your credit score is where it should be, since the higher your score, the lower your interest rate will be.

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How to Protect Your Finances While Traveling On Vacation

by Fiona Leung on Feb 16, 2019

Vacation season is almost upon us and, for many Americans who haven’t traveled abroad in several years, their vacations have been years in planning. However, even the best laid plans can quickly come unraveled if you don’t take some extra measures to ensure that your finances are protected before you leave on your trip.

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Start Saving for Retirement Today

by Fiona Leung on Feb 12, 2019

Time certainly goes by fast. One day you’re interviewing for your first job and the next thing you know you’re a few short years from applying for Social Security.

If you’ve planned for your retirement, you’ll likely have a good stash of funds saved.  But the unfortunate news is that according to the ​Insured Retirement Institute,​ 42 percent of baby boomers have nothing saved for retirement, and even those that have saved don’t have nearly enough to survive on.

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Social Security History and Benefits

by Fiona Leung on Feb 9, 2019

Created as a result of the Great Depression, The Social Security Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt in 1935; mainly due to the rise in poverty of the nation’s elderly population. The act was designed to provide retired workers ages 65 and older with a continuing income after retirement. The first Social Security card was created in November of 1936, with the numbers assigned by geographic region. To date, more than 450 million Social Security numbers have been issued since the program started.

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What is Zombie Debt?

by Fiona Leung on Feb 5, 2019

Zombie debt is old debt that is typically written off as bad debt by the original creditor and then later sold to collection agencies for pennies on the dollar. Most of the debt sold is years old and cannot legally be collected, though many consumers are unaware of the statute of limitations for legal collection of this debt. In many cases, zombie debt is legally unenforceable, meaning that unlike your current creditors, zombie debt collectors cannot sue you in order to collect the debt.

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